Augustenborg Botanical Roof Garden
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Augustenborg Botanical Roof Garden

The Augustenborg Botanical Roof Garden is a place for inspiration, research and education. The green roofs was installed in 1999 with support from the EU-LIFE fund, the Swedish Ministry of the Environment and the City of Malmö. The guided tours and the development-, educational- and project activities at the roofgarden is managed by Scandinavian Green Roof Institute in collaboration with the City of Malmö, VA SYD, E.ON, MKB, and several of the members within the Scandinavian Green Roof Association.

Today, Augustenborg Botanical Roof Garden is at the forefront of demonstrating some of the most innovative systems available on the market and a range of possibilities with green roofs. The Roofgarden contains more than 20 variated areas with different systems, different build up and inspiration gardens for urban farming and biodiversity. The roofs cover 9500 square meters and is on top of buildings where the Department of Internal Services, Malmö City, operates. Augustenborg Botanical Roof Garden can be visited by booked tours all year round and is open to the public in the summer season.

1. The annual flowers

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Augustenborg Botanical Roof Garden

The rowing medium consists of crushed bricks and compost. Crushed bricks are very useful as a material for green roofs as the weight is rather low, it is a porous material and can hold plant available water.

Poppy (Papaver sp.), Cornflower (Centaurea cyanus) and Candytuft (Iberis sp.) have been sown in here, amongst others. These are annual plants which means that they grow, blossom, seed itself and wither down during one growing season. Annuals hibernate only as seeds.

2. Straw based roof

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Augustenborg Botanical Roof Garden
This roof consists of a substrate based on, among other things, straws in the bottom. The roof was part of an EU project titled Green Clime Adapt with the aim of testing green roof using local materials.

3. Research site for mosses on green roofs

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Augustenborg Botanical Roof Garden

Nils Cronberg from SLU (Swedish University of Agriculture Sciences) is carrying out long term research on mosses that survives on extensive green roofs.

4. Biodiverse roof

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Augustenborg Botanical Roof Garden

Green roofs can be used as refuge for plant and animals when the urban environment becomes more and more densely exploited. This roof was designed replicate the habitat and biodiversity found in Limnhamns limestone quarry – a hotspot for biodiversity in the outskirts of Malmö.

5. Peter Stahre’s Memorial Garden

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Augustenborg Botanical Roof Garden

Peter Stahre was a driving spirit on sustainable drainage systems in Sweden and worldwide. Peter was very much involved in the Scandinavian Green Roof Association and due to his field of interest a flow form water feature was a natural choice for this garden.

6. The garden for native species

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Augustenborg Botanical Roof Garden

Several native species are well equipped for the harsh conditions  on a green roof. In this section of the roof garden our visitors can enjoy the beauty of several drought tolerant perennials that survive on extensive roofs with substrate depth of 10 cm.

7. The Grass Garden

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Augustenborg Botanical Roof Garden

The Grass Garden was constructed in 2009. The many different grass species forms the basis of the garden and it’s  designed in two different layers with a separating path of stone. Reaching up through the grass a bright colorful Echinacea purpureae and crispy white Allium tuberosum. Some of the grasses used are Calamagrostis acutiflora ‘Overdam’, Imperata cylindrical ‘Red Baron’ and Sesleria heufleriana.

8. The Hills

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Augustenborg Botanical Roof Garden

Malmö is a city without many hills – so why not create them on the roofs? Unlikely as it seems, the hills are light-weighted due to use   of expanded polystyrene . The vegetation represents a dry meadow with a long flowering season.

9. The garden for urban food production

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Augustenborg Botanical Roof Garden

At the Augustenborg Botanical Roof Garden we show that also roofs can be used for urban farming. Sun-loving vegetables and berries such as tomatoes and strawberries are produced during the summer months and in this edible garden.

10. Test site with hemp and bio-char

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Augustenborg Botanical Roof Garden

Hemp and bio-char are two possible future green roof products. Especially the bio-char is very interesting due to it being lightweight, is biodegrade very slowly, holds accessible water for the plants and buffers nutrients. Also, bio-char is  classified as a carbon sink. On this test site, we compare substrate mixes with bio-char compared with compost.

11. Test of different substrate depths

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Augustenborg Botanical Roof Garden

Within the national project ‘Quality-assured solutions for green roof gardens’ the Scandinavian green roof institute and SLU (Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences) test different substrate depths with a range of 32 wildflower plants.

12. Sand based roof

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Augustenborg Botanical Roof Garden

In collaboration with Peter Korn, and with our Green roof summer course 2015 participants installed a ‘pilot-site’ with two sand based green roofs. Peter Korn’s starting point is always the nature. The knowledge of plants’ natural habitats is the key to his way of growing them. We awaits with excitement to see how the roofs will evolve in 2016.

13. The moss exhibition

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Augustenborg Botanical Roof Garden

In the summer of 2013 we planted 22 moss species here after they had been collected from different places in our region. Here are some of the most common mosses in Sweden but also some rare species.

14. Innovation exhibition

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Augustenborg Botanical Roof Garden

In the spring of 2014 this innovation exhibition opened  where members of the Scandinavian Green Roof Association exhibit their best green roof systems and sustainable solutions.

15. The sedum exhibition

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Augustenborg Botanical Roof Garden

Here you can find not only Sedumspecies but also some plants from the Phedimus genus which are common on green roofs. Both genera belong in the family Crassulaceae. Many Crassulaceae plants are often called succulents, but this is only an umbrella name for drought tolerant plants with fleshy leaves or stems.